Game Meat Nutrition Page

Home on the Rio Grande

Elk Meat


Home | Contact Us
If you are lost....always return to HOME  Questions?  Email us
** For optimum viewing, FireFox users may wish to switch to Explorer **

Return To Shopping Cart


Gift Packs:

Elk Meat Packs

Buffalo Meat Packs

Combination Meat Packs

Elk Jerky-Sausage Packs

Buff Jerky-Sausage Packs

 

Whole, 1/2 and 1/4 Bundles:  ELK, BUFFALO

 

Specialty Items:

Elk Jerky

Buffalo Jerky

Elk Sausage

Buffalo Sausage

 

GAME MEAT Nutritional Information

1-888-338-4581

Made from FARM-RAISED, USDA Inspected, All Natural Elk and Game Meats

 

 

Frozen Meat:

Elk Meat

Buffalo Meat

Deer Meat

Goat Meat

 

Bargain Barn:

Special Deals

 

Specialty Items:

Alaska Seafood

Elk Ivory

Velvet Antler

Pet Foods

 

 

 

Elk Meat-Raw Nutrition Facts

Serving Size 4 ounces (1.3g)


Amount per Serving
Calories 130 Calories from fat 15
  % daily value
Total Fat 1.5g 3%
Saturated Fat 0.5 3%
Stearic Acid 0 g.
Polyunsaturated 0 g.
Monounsaturated 0 g.
Cholesterol 60 mg 21%
Soduim 65mg 3%
Potassium 350mg 10%
Total Carbohydrate 0 g 0%
Dietary Fiber 0 g 0%
Soluble Fiber 0 g.  
Insoluble Fiber 0 g.  
Sugars 0 g  
Sugar Alcohols 0 g.  
Other Carbohydrates 0 g.  
Protein 25gm

Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 0%
Calcium 0% Iron 15%
Vitamin E 0% Thiamin 20%
Riboflavin 45% Niacin 30%
Vitamin B6 20% Folute 2%
Vitamin B12 110%  
Pantothenic Acid 25% Phosphorus 20%
Iodine Magnesium 6%
Zinc 20% Copper 6%
Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be bigger depending on your calorie needs
Calories per gram
Fat 9 Car 4 Protein 4

 


 

ELK & Game MEAT 
NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION


Elk and Game meats are very low in fat and cholesterol, and the farmed game animals are not treated with growth hormones or chemicals. The following statistics were taken from Outdoor Life, August 1992, which had an excellent article written by Kathy Etling entitled "The Wild Diet". 
The following two charts are exerts from that article:

Comparison Percentages of Good Fat vs. Bad Fat
Species Saturated (bad fat) %Fatty Acids
Monounsaturated
Polyunsaturated (good fat)
Beef 46.3 45.5 8.2
Buffalo 43.2 45.0 11.8
Mule Deer 48.0 31.8 20.2
Whitetail Deer 45.6 30.6 23.9
Elk 48.4 26.6 24.9
Antelope 41.2 27.1 31.6
Moose 36.6 24.3 39.1
Boar 35.7 47. 17.3
Caribou 46.6 36.4 17.0
Rabbit 39.0 35.6 25.4
Squirrel 15.2 47.2 37.6
Some game meat is high in dietary cholesterol than domestic meats, but the combination of more lean body tissue, generally fewer calories, less saturated fat and significantly higher percentage of cholesterol-reducing polyunsaturated fatty acids makes game a heart-healthy choice. Game meat also has a significantly higher content of EPA than domestic meat.   EPA is thought to reduce the risk of developing arteriosclerosis, one of the major causes of heart attack and stroke.
Source: North Dakota Sate University and U.S. Department of Agriculture

While some game meats might have a slightly higher percentage of bad fat, they are great for the good fat vs bad fat ratio, and have a significantly LOWER total fat content as described below:

Nutrient Content: Tale of the Tape
Species Protein % Fat % Cholesterol (mg/100g*) Calories (Kcal/100g*)
Beef (USDA choice) 22.0 6.5 72 180
Beef (USDA standard) 22.7 2.0 69 152
Lamb 20.8 5.7 66 167
Pork 22.3 4.9 71 165
Wild Boar** 28.3 4.38 109 160
Buffalo 21.7 1.9 62 138
Whitetail Deer 23.6 1.4 116 149
Mule Deer 23.7 1.3 107 145
Elk 22.8 .9 67 137
Moose 22.1 .5 71 130
Antelope 22.5 .9 112 144
Squirrel 21.4 3.2 83 149
Cottontail 21.8 2.4 77 144
Jackrabbit 21.9 2.4 131 153
Chicken 23.6 .7 62 135
Turkey (domestic) 23.5 1.5 60 146
Wild Turkey 25.7 1.1 55 163
Pheasant (domestic) 23.9 .8 71 144
Wild Pheasant 25.7 .6 52 148
Gray Partridge 25.6 .7 85 151
Sharptail Grouse 23.8 .7 105 142
Sage Grouse 23.7 1.1 101 140
Dove 22.9 1.8 94 145
Sandhill Crane 21.7 2.4 123 153
Snow Goose 22.7 3.6 142 121
Duck (domestic) 19.9 4.25 89 180
Mallard 23.1 2.0 140 152
Widgeon 22.6 2.1 131 153

*100 grams equals about 3 1/2 ounces.

** Not trimmed of fat before analysis.

In the above chart, all visible fat was trimmed before analysis. However, surveys show that carcasses of domesticated animals have 25 to 30 percent fat while the average fat content of wild game animals is only 4.3 percent. Not only is the quantity of fat lower in game, but the quantity is also healthier. Fat from wild game contains a much higher proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids-good fat- and is lower in saturated fat-bad fat.

Source: North Dakota State University

Elk meat is healthy, low fat, low and Great Taste! Grande Premium Meats sells only North American Elk and other American game meats.  Eat more Elk! It's Healthy and Grrreat!

 

Please Call Grande Premium Meats at 719-657-0942, 1-888-338-4581

7:30 AM to 6 PM Mtn Time

or
Email us  for questions regarding any of these Products. 

We Accept